SÉRUSIER, Hill with Poplars

Paul SÉRUSIER (1864-1927), Hill with Poplars, 1907, oil on canvas, 73.3 x 54.4 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Paul SÉRUSIER (1864-1927)
Hill with Poplars
1907
oil on canvas
73.3 x 54.4 cm
© MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
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Convinced that the straight line was purely a human invention, Sérusier endeavoured to show, through the undulating verticals of poplar boles, that nature works in curves. The artist thus composed by alternating between essential geometric motifs and happy accidents of nature, sometimes at the risk of provoking them.
 
Colour is given the same clever orchestration. With a matte finish that strives to achieve the harmony of greys of the old masters, he makes use of a dual palette, according to a principle long held in his work and regularly confirmed by his successive attempts to establish a colour circle. The cool colours with dominant greens and warm colours based on ochre create the overall atmosphere, that of a late autumn landscape. However, fully aware that he is engaging in the act of painting and not slavishly copying nature, Sérusier introduces discordances meant to exalt the colours. The yellow spot at the base of the dead branch has no purpose other than to increase the painting's luminosity.
 
In Hill with Poplars, six essential colours come into play: ochre, green, yellow, blue grey, pink and black, bathing the landscape in autumn light. For the application of colour, Sérusier used a technique similar to glazes to achieve the effect of the old masters. After preparing the canvas, it was evenly covered with the dominant green shade. The different layers of colours were then superimposed, while still allowing the overall harmony to seep through. By using this delicate treatment, Sérusier was able to create effects of transparency and depth, a quality that could not be developed through the Synthetism of the Nabi period.
 

Artworks in context : Post-Impressionism (16)

Félix VALLOTTON (1865-1925), The Waltz, 1893, oil on canvas, 61 x 50 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Henri Edmond CROSS (1856-1910), Beach at Vignasse, The Golden Isles, 1891-1892, oil on canvas, 65.5 x 92.2 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Édouard VUILLARD (1868-1940), Children Reading, 1906, oil on board, 14.5 x 26 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Pierre BONNARD (1867-1947), Interior at the Balcony, 1919, oil on canvas, 52 x 77 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel — © ADAGP, Paris, 2013
Paul SÉRUSIER (1864-1927), The Corydon Shepherd, 1913, oil on canvas, 73 x 99 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Charles COTTET (1863-1925), Mountain, ca. 1900-1910, oil on board, 53 x 74 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Jules Léon FLANDRIN (1871-1947), La Pavlova and Nijinsky, 1909, oil on board, 52 x 67.3 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn — © ADAGP, Paris, 2015
Pierre LAPRADE (1875-1931), Saint-Trojan, Terrace, oil on canvas, 60 x 73 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Paul SÉRUSIER (1864-1927), Hill with Poplars, 1907, oil on canvas, 73.3 x 54.4 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Paul SÉRUSIER (1864-1927), Still Life with Reeds or Primrose and Corn, 1904, oil on canvas, 60.5 x 73.5 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Félix VALLOTTON (1865-1925), The Top Hat, Interior or The Visit, 1887, oil on canvas, 32.7 x 24.8 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Félix VALLOTTON (1865-1925), Still Life with Apples, 1910, oil on canvas, 38 x 46 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / David Fogel
Félix VALLOTTON (1865-1925), Roman Bridge at Cagnes, 1923, oil on canvas, 73.5 x 60 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Pierre LAPRADE (1875-1931), Bouquet of Wild Flowers, oil on canvas, 61.5 x 38 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Charles COTTET (1863-1925), Venice, ca.1895-1896, oil on canvas, 73.2 x 92.5 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn
Charles COTTET (1863-1925), Sudanese Village (Aswan 1895), 1895, oil on paper pasted on panel, 32.3 x 41.5 cm. © MuMa Le Havre / Florian Kleinefenn